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Helping Trumpeter Swans for more than 50 years thanks to people like you!

The Trumpeter Swan Society (TTSS) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1968 and dedicated to assuring the vitality and welfare of wild Trumpeter Swans. 

We are the only non-profit organization working for Trumpeter Swan conservation across North America.

You're invited to explore our website. See the impact you too can make for Trumpeter Swans.

News & Notes

IOWA: Iowan has a number of places to see wintering trumpeter swans. If you want to see white this Christmas, snow may be lacking (for now), but trumpeter swans will fill the gap for an outstanding wildlife moment. Read more...

MARYLAND: It’s the time of the year when tundra swans arrive in the Chesapeake Bay from the northern regions of Canada. The swans arrive primarily as family groups, two parents and up to two goslings. This month, more than 100 swans arrived at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Read more...

OKLAHOMA: Trumpeter swans may occasionally be seen in the Skiatook area. We saw a few on a neighbor’s pond in January of 2006. Last week my wife and I were up at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, north of Pawhuska, and noted several on a pond just to north of the Visitor’s Center. If they happen to be in our area, they will be here from mid-November through early March. Read more...

IOWA: "For North Country trumpeter swans, the signals were clear. It was time to head south. Southbound flocks varying in size from small family groups to gatherings containing twenty or more were soon dotting the Iowa skies. With only a couple of days remaining in this year’s [North Zone] duck season, it is the swan migration that I will remember the most. By mid-morning, the swans seemed to be everywhere. I later learned that virtually every lake and marsh that still contained bits of open water had attracted at least some of the huge migrants." Read more...

WASHINGTON: Trumpeter swans have returned to local fields in northwest Washington. The lowlands of northwest Washington are again dotted with thousands of photogenic migratory birds. Snow geese, trumpeter swans and tundra swans have returned to Skagit, Snohomish, Island, Whatcom and other Western Washington counties. About 20,000 swans and 80,000 snow geese spend the winter months in the area in Western Washington each year. Most congregate in the Stillaguamish and Skagit valleys from mid-October through early May.

Fish and Wildlife has set up a hotline to report sick, injured or dead swans as part of its ongoing effort to assess the impact of lead poisoning on swans.

People can call 360-466-4345, ext. 266, to report swans that have died or need help. Callers should leave a short message, including their name and phone number, as well as a detailed location of the swan and its condition. The hotline is available through March. Read more...

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