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Celebrating 52 years helping Trumpeter Swans thanks to people like you!

The Trumpeter Swan Society (TTSS) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1968 and dedicated to assuring the vitality and welfare of wild Trumpeter Swans. 

We are the only non-profit organization working for Trumpeter Swan conservation across North America.

You're invited to explore our website. See the impact you too can make for Trumpeter Swans.

News & Notes

ALBERTA: "Known for their shyness, it's not easy to get a good glimpse of the largest migratory bird in North America. But that means that when it happens, it's all the more impactful. Naturalist Brian Keating said over the last couple of years, he has seen trumpeter swans in the city of Calgary flying up and down the Bow River. When it happens, he said it fills his heart with joy...In Keating's view, the increased presence of the trumpeter swan in the province is one of the real success stories in Alberta's backyard." Read more...

OREGON: "The new female trumpeter swan at the Sunriver Nature Center has been named Valentina, or Val for short, since she was brought to the center just before Valentine’s Day. The nature center received several name suggestions after the swan was introduced Feb. 10 to Gus, the resident trumpeter swan who was alone since last fall when his mate, Gracie, was found dead from a likely coyote attack." Read more...

ALASKA: This article has great information about Trumpeter Swan facts. Check it out! "On the nesting grounds, they choose freshwater marshes, ponds, and small rivers, building nests on beaver dams and lodges, hummocks, and platforms of floating vegetation. The nests are typically surrounded by water, giving them room for a running take-off when departing. Both male and female work on nest-building, both birds collecting material but the female doing most of the construction. The big eggs are laid at intervals of one and a half to two days (not daily, as in most birds). Both members of the pair incubate the clutch of (usually) four to six eggs, but neither develops an incubation patch on the body…they incubate the eggs with their huge, well-vascularized feet! " Read more...

NEW YORK: "Well, it finally arrived. Spring! How do I know? The geese and swans told me...This year the swans really put on a show for wildlife lovers. More swans showed up than ever before (I’d estimate about 200 at first) and they parked themselves right in this small marsh for the whole world to see. They began to arrive on March 9th and only recently began to moving north about March 17th." Read more...

MONTANA: "his last weekend was a good one for birdwatchers at Freezout Lake west of Great Falls. Some folks from Hamilton were there and experienced the spectacle of an estimated 25,500 Snow Geese and Ross's Geese, along with about 2,400 migrating Tundras and Trumpeter Swans in their annual spring stopover at the ponds of the Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area...Because of it's location along the Rocky Mountain Front, on a main flyway, Freezout usually has visits from over 230 species of birds throughout the year, but the days of the migrating geese and swans are memorable...Because of its location along the Rocky Mountain Front, on a main flyway, Freezeout usually has visits from over 230 species of birds throughout the year , but the days of migrating geese and swans are memorable." Read more...

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