Celebrating 50 years thanks to people like you!

The Trumpeter Swan Society (TTSS) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1968 and dedicated to assuring the vitality and welfare of wild Trumpeter Swans. 

We are the only non-profit organization working for Trumpeter Swan conservation across North America.

You're invited to explore our website. See the impact you too can make for Trumpeter Swans.

News & Notes

That is a question we receive at The Trumpeter Swan Society. Feeding young swans "human food" or food that is rich in protein and calories can also contribute to "angel wing" during their growth, a deformity of the wings which can permanently prevent a swan from flying.

Here is a video by Michael Kent of a swan cygnet that has “angel wing” on both wings. See what feeding young swans "human food" can lead to...

IDAHO & WYOMING: The Trumpeter Swan Society is a funding partner in the Western Wyoming Project. Help us to continue support swan habitat and research project through a donation to our North American Swan Fund. The Upper Snake River region will receive $1 million to protect and enhance 1,691 acres of migrating, breeding and wintering habitat. The funding will specifically target improvements to benefit trumpeter swan, northern pintail and mallard ducks. Another project will permanently protect 785 acres, while restoring 2,370 acres and enhancing 563 acres in Western Wyoming. TTSS is a funding NAWCA of this project that will benefit many species including mallard, Northern pintail, lesser scaup, wood duck, redhead, canvasback, ring-necked duck, American wigeon, Canada geese, "and arguably the most iconic to the people of western Wyoming, the trumpeter swan." Read more...

WISCONSIN: A Century Ago, There Were No Trumpeter Swans Left In Wisconsin, Today Their Numbers Reach 6K. Wisconsin Public Radio shares the story of the beginnings of Wisconsin's trumpeter swan restoration thirty years ago. Flights to Alaska to collect eggs in wild swan nests, to hatching the eggs at zoo partners, the return of trumpeter swans to Wisconsin is a story of adventure, dedication and persistence. Read more...

MONTANA: Five Trumpeter Swan cygnets were released into the Blackfoot Valley at Jones Lake on the Rolling Stone Ranch. "Greg Neudecker, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, explained to about 150 people gathered at the edge of the lake that after 15 years, they’re close to concluding the efforts to re-establish trumpeter swans in the Blackfoot watershed... for three years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took eggs from nests in Canada, where the trumpeter swan population was thriving. They had a strategy; usually, trumpeter swans lay four to seven eggs. Neudecker’s group would leave two that were fertile and take the rest.

“We gathered 60 eggs for three years in a row,” he said. “Then we took them to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, to hatch, then brought them here and released them...So far, the Fish and Wildlife Service and a host of partners have released 250 trumpeter swans in the Blackfoot Valley in the past 15 years, with a goal of seven successful nesting pairs for two consecutive years in a row.” Read more...

WISCONSIN: Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine takes a fascinating look back at the story of the return of trumpeter swans to the state. "RESEARCHERS REWIND 30 YEARS TO TELL THEIR FIRST-PERSON TALE OF SECOND CHANCES FOR AN ESTEEMED SPECIES."
"The plan was to collect eggs from the wilds of Alaska to be hatched at the Milwaukee County Zoo. The young would be reared in captivity and in the wild before they were released. DNR research scientists, wildlife managers and technicians were involved along with participants from the zoo, UW-Madison and scores of organizations and individuals.

In spring 1989, three years after the state set a recovery goal of 20 breeding and migratory trumpeter swan pairs by the year 2000, we prepared to go to Fairbanks, Alaska, our launch point west toward the vast wetland complex known as the Minto Flats. This was where the first of our Alaskan trumpeter swan egg collections would occur." Read more...

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