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Celebrating 52 years helping Trumpeter Swans thanks to people like you!

The Trumpeter Swan Society (TTSS) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1968 and dedicated to assuring the vitality and welfare of wild Trumpeter Swans. 

We are the only non-profit organization working for Trumpeter Swan conservation across North America.

You're invited to explore our website. See the impact you too can make for Trumpeter Swans.

News & Notes

MICHIGAN: "Tens of thousands of trumpeter swans once flourished in the Great Lakes region. But widespread hunting brought the birds to the brink of extinction, and the species was wiped out in Michigan over 100 years ago. A decades-long effort spearheaded by the W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary at Michigan State University has helped bring trumpeter swans back to the Great Lakes — and now, if you’re lucky, you might just catch a glimpse of these protected birds in the wild." Read more...

OREGON: "Eloise, the most prolific trumpeter swan in Oregon’s breeding program, has died of natural causes at her home at the Lake Aspen Golf Course in Sisters.

Golf course staff found Eloise’s body Monday, less than four months after her mate, Pete, died unexpectedly from a bacterial infection.

“I’m personally convinced she died of a broken heart,” said Robin Gold, a wildlife rehabilitation expert who lives in the Aspen Lakes neighborhood and cared for the swan pair.

Eloise and Pete produced 15 young in the past three years. The pair boosted an effort to repopulate the species, which is still recovering from near extinction at the turn of the 20th century." Read more...

NEVADA: Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge is both a home and stopover to thousands of migratory birds. "There are many things to do at Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, locally known as the “Ruby Marshes.” Birding sits at the top of the list for some. There are at least 225 species. ..The refuge is considered the most remote national wildlife refuge in the contiguous states...Depending on the time of year, we could have both trumpeter and tundra swans on the refuge,” said Ruby Lake wildlife biologist Jane Bardolf. “During the breeding season, we just have a few trumpeter swans.” Read more...

MONTANA: "In the early 1990s, the CSKT, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and Montana FWP began discussing how to return trumpeter swans to western Montana after the bird’s century-long absence. Beginning 1996, Becker led the re-introduction of trumpeter twans on the Flathead Reservation and in north western Montana...t was important to the Tribes’ two Elder committees that we replace this important missing piece of the region’s bio-fauna.”

“When you look up, and see trumpeter swans passing over, that’s Dale,” McDonald said. “They are a part of his legacy.” Read more...

ALBERTA: "Known for their shyness, it's not easy to get a good glimpse of the largest migratory bird in North America. But that means that when it happens, it's all the more impactful. Naturalist Brian Keating said over the last couple of years, he has seen trumpeter swans in the city of Calgary flying up and down the Bow River. When it happens, he said it fills his heart with joy...In Keating's view, the increased presence of the trumpeter swan in the province is one of the real success stories in Alberta's backyard." Read more...

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