Trumpeter Watch: Preliminary Results


Missouri

Missouri observers have recorded the highest number of Trumpeter Swans wintering in states south of the 40th parallel with sightings in 41 of 114 counties. Based on preliminary results, TTSS recognizes Mega Areas in three counties and Focal Areas in ten additional counties, plus a lot of public land areas with wintering potential. We expect to add several counties to the swan occurrence list, and to upgrade several Potential Areas to Focal Areas this winter, working together with the St. Louis Audubon, and staff and visitors to the new Audubon Center at Riverlands, at the Army Corps of Engineers Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary, to increase observation efforts. The Missouri Cache Sparks database gives us a powerful tool.
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See Also

St. Louis Audubon
Audubon Center at Riverlands
Missouri Cache Sparks
 

Kansas

Kansas has an incredible database of bird species occurrence by county, and Chuck Otte, coordinator of the Kansas Checklist Project and President of the Kansas Ornithological Society, has been generous with sharing information with TTSS. In turn Trumpeter Watch contributes data back to the Kansas Checklist Project. As of the winter of 2010-11, Trumpeter Swans have been recorded in 57 of Kansas' 105 counties, and are now expected annually in winter anywhere in the eastern two thirds of the state. Our worry is that they have gotten common enough that observers will not report them! Most reports occur November through February with a growing number of birds staying into March and, more rarely, into April. Observations in grain fields, away from wetlands, reservoirs, and rivers are increasing. There are six focal areas, but to date no Mega area in Kansas. Just a matter of time?
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Oklahoma

While Oklahoma is thought to be substantially south of Trumpeter Swan breeding areas, a steady stream of birds are beginning to explore wintering areas with open water in 17 of Oklahoma's 77 counties. While Oklahoma is thought to be substantially south of Trumpeter Swan breeding areas, a steady stream of birds are beginning to explore wintering areas with open water in 17 of Oklahoma's 77 counties. Oklahoma has a very active Listserv/eBird community, and birders report regularly from state-wide areas. These records, along with those of several Oklahoma residents and agency biologists who report to TTSS directly, have enabled us to identify several Focal Areas, spread across five counties, with two additional counties identified with Potential Areas (repeated use by small single family groups or individuals) that may soon reach numbers to warrant that Focal Area designation. To date Oklahoma has no Mega Areas.
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Tennessee & Kentucky

Scott Somershoe, state ornithologist for the Tennessee Wildlife Research Agency, keeps us apprised on sightings, which seem to be on the increase for Tennessee and neighboring Kentucky. Steven Ramirez has drafted a preliminary results map of reported sightings, and we look forward to doing more work here in the future.
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